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Take a look and find the right large dog for you! Easy to train dogs are more adept at forming an association between a prompt such as the word "sit" , an action sitting , and a consequence getting a treat very quickly. Other dogs need more time, patience, and repetition during training. Many breeds are intelligent but approach training with a "What's in it for me? Dogs who were bred for jobs that require decision making, intelligence, and concentration, such as herding livestock, need to exercise their brains, just as dogs who were bred to run all day need to exercise their bodies.

If they don't get the mental stimulation they need, they'll make their own work -- usually with projects you won't like, such as digging and chewing. Obedience training and interactive dog toys are good ways to give a dog a brain workout, as are dog sports and careers, such as agility and search and rescue. Common in most breeds during puppyhood and in retriever breeds at all ages, mouthiness means a tendency to nip, chew, and play-bite a soft, fairly painless bite that doesn't puncture the skin.

Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or "herd" their human family members, and they need training to learn that it's fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people. Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a chew toy that's been stuffed with kibble and treats. Some breeds sound off more often than others. When choosing a breed, think about how the dog vocalizes — with barks or howls — and how often.

If you're considering a hound, would you find their trademark howls musical or maddening? If you're considering a watchdog, will a city full of suspicious "strangers" put him on permanent alert? Will the local wildlife literally drive your dog wild? Do you live in housing with noise restrictions?

Do you have neighbors nearby? Some breeds are more free-spirited than others. Nordic dogs such as Siberian Huskies were bred to range long distances, and given the chance, they'll take off after anything that catches their interest. And many hounds simply must follow their noses, or that bunny that just ran across the path, even if it means leaving you behind. High-energy dogs are always ready and waiting for action. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday.

They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they're more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells. Low-energy dogs are the canine equivalent of a couch potato, content to doze the day away. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you'll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. A vigorous dog may or may not be high-energy, but everything he does, he does with vigor: he strains on the leash until you train him not to , tries to plow through obstacles, and even eats and drinks with great big gulps.

These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who's elderly or frail. A low-vigor dog, on the other hand, has a more subdued approach to life. Some breeds do fine with a slow evening stroll around the block. Others need daily, vigorous exercise -- especially those that were originally bred for physically demanding jobs, such as herding or hunting. Without enough exercise, these breeds may put on weight and vent their pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking, chewing, and digging.

Breeds that need a lot of exercise are good for outdoorsy, active people, or those interested in training their dog to compete in a high-energy dog sport, such as agility. Some dogs are perpetual puppies -- always begging for a game -- while others are more serious and sedate. Although a playful pup sounds endearing, consider how many games of fetch or tag you want to play each day, and whether you have kids or other dogs who can stand in as playmates for the dog.

Breed Characteristics: Adaptability. All Around Friendliness. Health Grooming. Exercise Needs. See Dogs With Low Intensity. Vital Stats: Dog Breed Group:. The Anatolian Shepherd Dog is a considered a livestock protector or guardian dog. As such, they were developed to live with the flock and adopt it as their own. They are rugged, self-confident guardians who know how much protection or intimidation is necessary in any situation. The Anatolian has been working independently for centuries, making decisions regarding threats to their property.

As a puppy , they adopt whomever they live with, be it a family or a herd of sheep; as they grow, they take on the protector gig. It doesn't matter to the Anatolian whether their "flock" is human or animal. They are extremely protective and possessive. And they back up their guardian nature with presence.


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  • Anatolian Shepherd Breed Information.

The Anatolian is a large dog, weighing as much as pounds. They have a short, fawn coat and a black mask.

They appear intimidating, and if necessary they are—though they're calm and friendly with their family. Not surprisingly for a guard dog, the Anatolian Shepherd is suspicious of strangers and reserved with those outside their "flock. At the same time, the Anatolian is a very intelligent, loyal, steady working dog.

They need an owner who is strong, kind, and consistent as a pack leader. This breed is probably not a good choice as a family pet if you have very young children.

Guardian and Protector: The Loyal Anatolian Shepherd Dog Breed

Because they're so large, they could accidentally injure a small child, especially when they're a clumsy, growing puppy the phrase "bull in a china shop" applies. Additionally, the Anatolian typically does not respect children as pack leaders, and they could decide to protect their children from visiting playmates if they're roughhousing and the dog misinterprets the activity. Generally, the Anatolian is tolerant of older children and is good with them. To them, children are, of course, part of the flock that needs guarding, along with the rest of the family. The Anatolian Shepherd is not the perfect breed for everyone.

They can be a fine and loyal companion if you and your family understand their unique qualities and requirements and are ready to take on the responsibility of owning a very large and protective dog. If you're looking to adopt an Anatolian Shepherd, meet them first and consult a breed expert to make sure you are ready for the challenge and responsibility. It is critical that the Anatolian Shepherd receive proper socialization and training so that they can learn what is normal and what is a threat. Untrained and un-socialized Anatolian Shepherds can become overprotective , aggressive, and uncontrollable.

Anatolian Shepherds are independent and less eager to please than other breeds. They won't not necessarily wait for instructions but will act if they think their "flock" is threatened. Secure fencing is an abolute must. Some Anatolians are champion diggers. As guardians of their territory, some can be barkers , especially at night.

Some Anatolians can be dog-aggressive. They shed profusely, especially in the spring. Expect a challenge for leadership at some point with the Anatolian Shepherd. Owners must be willing to exercise pack authority consistently and kindly. Because they are so large, expect high costs for boarding, medications, and food purchases; you'll also need a large vehicle for them. Anatolian Shepherd Dogs are sensitive to anesthesia.

Discuss this with your veterinarian before any surgical procedures.


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To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a good shelter or rescue that will vaccinate, provide veterinary care, and require applicants to meet with dogs beforehand to make sure they are a good match. The Anatolian Shepherd Dog breed is named for their homeland of Anatolia in the central part of Turkey, where they are still a point of pride and have even been honored on a national postage stamp. It's thought that the working ancestors of the breed date back 6, years. Wandering tribes from central Asia probably brought the first mastiff-type dogs into the area that is now Turkey, and sight hound breeds from southern regions contributed to the Anatolian's agility , long legs, and aloof character.

Due to the climate and terrain of the area, the local population developed a nomadic way of life, dependent on flocks of sheep and goats. The protection of those flocks, and of the shepherds themselves, was the job of the large dogs who traveled with them. The dogs became known as coban kopegi, Turkish for "shepherd dog.

They also had to be large and strong enough to stand up to predators. Severe culling and breeding of only the best workers resulted in a dog with a uniform type, stable temperament, and excellent working ability. Dogs were often not fed once they were past puppyhood. They lived by killing gophers and other small animals, though never injuring their flock. They were fitted with iron collars with long spikes to protect their throats from assailants. You can still find working dogs wearing these collars in Turkey today.

Anatolian Shepherds got their most enthusiastic introduction in the U. Department of Agriculture as a gift, for experimental work as guardians of flocks. It moved to the Working Group in August Males stand 29 inches tall and weigh to pounds. Females stand 27 inches tall and weigh 80 to pounds. The Anatolian Shepherd Dog is highly intelligent, independent, and dominant. They think for themselves—a necessary characteristic for a livestock guardian. They're very protective of their family and flock, and they consider themselves to be constantly on duty.

Though protective, the Anatolian Shepherd is calm, friendly, and affectionate with their immediate family. They are not friendly with strangers and are very reserved with those outside their family, even if they're friends or relatives of yours. Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training , and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them.

If you want to adopt, you may prefer to choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up their littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when they grow up, though that may not be possible if you are adopting from a shelter or rescue. Like every dog, the Anatolian Shepherd needs early socialization—exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences—when they're young.

Socialization helps ensure that your Anatolian Shepherd puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling them in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly and taking your dog to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help them polish their social skills.

Did You Know?

Anatolian Shepherds are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they're prone to certain health conditions. Not all Anatolian Shepherds will get any or all of these diseases, but it's important to be aware of them if you're considering this breed. Here is some more information about conditions that may appear in dogs of this breed: Hip Dysplasia: This is an inherited condition in which the thighbone doesn't fit snugly into the hip joint.

Some dogs show pain and lameness on one or both rear legs, but others don't display outward signs of discomfort. X-ray screening is the most certain way to diagnose the problem. Put at least as much effort into researching your puppy as you would into choosing a new car or expensive appliance. It will save you money in the long run. Red flags include puppies always being available, multiple litters on the premises, having your choice of any puppy, and the ability to pay online with a credit card.

Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. The puppy you buy should have been raised in a clean home environment, from parents with health clearances to prove that they are good specimens of the breed. Before you decide to buy a puppy, consider whether an adult Anatolian might better suit your needs and lifestyle. Puppies are loads of fun, but they require a lot of time and effort before they grow up to become the dog of your dreams.

An adult may already have some training and will probably be less active, destructive and demanding than a puppy. If you are interested in acquiring an older dog through breeders, ask them about purchasing a retired show dog or if they know of an adult dog who needs a new home. If you want to adopt a dog, read the advice below on how to do that. There are many great options available if you want to adopt a dog from an animal shelter or breed rescue organization.

Here is how to get started. Sites like Petfinder.

Individual Puppies at Six Weeks

The site allows you to be very specific in your requests housetraining status, for example or very general all the Anatolians available on Petfinder across the country. AnimalShelter can help you find animal rescue groups in your area. Social media is another great way to find a dog. Post on your Facebook page that you are looking for a specific breed so that your entire community can be your eyes and ears.

Start talking with all the pet pros in your area about your desire for an Anatolian. That includes vets, dog walkers, and groomers. When someone has to make the tough decision to give up a dog, that person will often ask her own trusted network for recommendations. Networking can help you find a dog that may be the perfect companion for your family. Most people who love Anatolians love all Anatolians.


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  4. You can also search online for other Anatolian rescues in your area. The great thing about breed rescue groups is that they tend to be very upfront about any health conditions the dogs may have and are a valuable resource for advice. They also often offer fostering opportunities so, with training, you could bring an Anatolian home with you to see what the experience is like.

    You now know the things to discuss with a breeder, but there are also questions you should discuss with shelter or rescue group staff or volunteers before you bring home a pup. These include:. Wherever you acquire your Anatolian, make sure you have a good contract with the seller, shelter or rescue group that spells out responsibilities on both sides. Petfinder offers an Adopters Bill of Rights that helps you understand what you can consider normal and appropriate when you get a dog from a shelter. Puppy or adult, take your Anatolian to your veterinarian soon after adoption.

    Your veterinarian will be able to spot problems, and will work with you to set up a preventive regimen that will help you avoid many health issues. Bartonella is a type bacteria that can be transmitted to cats, dogs and humans from exposure to infected fleas and…. Want to give your pup yummy, low-calorie treats? Not sure about food puzzles? Our veterinarian reveals why the payoff for your pet is well worth any extra work. The friendly and inquisitive LaPerm has an easy-care coat that comes in a variety of colors and patterns.

    Check out our collection of more than videos about pet training, animal behavior, dog and cat breeds and more. Wonder which dog or cat best fits your lifestyle? Our new tool will narrow down more than breeds for you. If the video doesn't start playing momentarily, please install the latest version of Flash. Anatolian Shepherd.

    Sally Anne Thompson, Animal Photography. Mary Bloom. Eva Maria Kramer, Animal Photography. Breed Characteristics Adaptability How easily a dog deals with change. Tendency to enjoy or tolerate other dogs. Amount and frequency of dog hair shedding. Amount of warmth or friendliness displayed.

    Level of daily activity needed. Preferred amount of interaction with other pets and humans. Factors such as dog size and his tendency to make noise. Amount of bathing, brushing, even professional grooming needed. Tendency to be welcoming to new people. Breed's level of vocalization.

    Anatolian Shepherd

    Level of health issues a breed tends to have. A dog's inclination to be protective of his home, yard or even car. Tendency toward a tolerance for cats and a lower prey drive. A dog's thinking and problem-solving ability not trainability. Level of ease in learning something new and a willingness to try new things. Dogs that tend to be more sturdy, playful and easygoing around children and more tolerant of children's behavior. How lighthearted and spirited a dog tends to be. A breed that is likely to alert you to the presence of strangers. Adaptability How easily a dog deals with change.

    Did You Know? Anatolian Temperament and Personality The Anatolian is a large dog with a protective and territorial nature. What You Need to Know About Anatolian Health All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Basics of Anatolian Grooming This is a double-coated breed that sheds heavily. Finding an Anatolian Whether you want to go with a breeder or get your dog from a shelter or rescue, here are some things to keep in mind.

    Choosing an Anatolian Breeder Finding a good breeder is the key to finding the right puppy. Adopting a Dog From an Anatolian Rescue or Shelter There are many great options available if you want to adopt a dog from an animal shelter or breed rescue organization. Use the Web Sites like Petfinder. Reach Out to Local Experts Start talking with all the pet pros in your area about your desire for an Anatolian.

    Talk to Breed Rescue Networking can help you find a dog that may be the perfect companion for your family. Key Questions to Ask You now know the things to discuss with a breeder, but there are also questions you should discuss with shelter or rescue group staff or volunteers before you bring home a pup.

    These include: What is his energy level? How is he around other animals? How does he respond to shelter workers, visitors and children? What is his personality like? What is his age? Is he housetrained? Has he ever bitten or hurt anyone that they know of? Are there any known health issues? Join the Conversation Like this article? Have a point of view to share? Let us know! Find a Veterinarian Near Watch the Latest Vetstreet Videos Check out our collection of more than videos about pet training, animal behavior, dog and cat breeds and more. Featured Video Meet the Italian Greyhound If the video doesn't start playing momentarily, please install the latest version of Flash.

    You need JavaScript enabled to view this video. Select Dog or Cat. Thank you for subscribing. All rights reserved. Powered by Brightspot. Vetstreet does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Top of Page. Dog Friendly Tendency to enjoy or tolerate other dogs. Shedding Level Amount and frequency of dog hair shedding. Affection Level Amount of warmth or friendliness displayed. Exercise Needs Level of daily activity needed. Social Needs Preferred amount of interaction with other pets and humans. Apartment Friendly Factors such as dog size and his tendency to make noise.

    Grooming Amount of bathing, brushing, even professional grooming needed. Stranger Friendly Tendency to be welcoming to new people. Barking Tendencies Breed's level of vocalization. Health Issues Level of health issues a breed tends to have. Territorial A dog's inclination to be protective of his home, yard or even car. Cat Friendly Tendency toward a tolerance for cats and a lower prey drive. Intelligence A dog's thinking and problem-solving ability not trainability. Trainability Level of ease in learning something new and a willingness to try new things. Child Friendly Dogs that tend to be more sturdy, playful and easygoing around children and more tolerant of children's behavior.

    Playfulness How lighthearted and spirited a dog tends to be.