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Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Nov 27, James rated it did not like it Shelves: business-fiction , business-and-leadership. There is this genre I call business fiction. The characteristics of the genre are as follows: 1. A Simple contrived narrative with a pedantic plod. An aim at communicating common sense wisdom for the business world. A healthy overlay of positive thinking. Lots of slogans that would look nic There is this genre I call business fiction. Lots of slogans that would look nice on a plaque over your desk.

Maybe a nice motivational poster. Well truth be told, some authors in the genre have more quality than others.

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Not this one, but it distinguishes itself as providing the template for all such books that followed. Written thirty years ago, this New York Times bestseller, follows the adventures of a young man in search for the greatest management model in the universe. Presumably this is to rule the galaxy though this is more implied than said. Some of the managers he observes are focused on people but not results. Others focus on results but screw people over.

That is until he discovers the 'One Minute Manager. At all. A minute here and there will suffice. Actually there is some helpful management advice: 1. Have employees write out a word summary of their goals main objectives which you both keep on file. The process of clarifying things so that both managers and employees know what their objectives are means greater success and less communication is necessary.

The One Minute praise-Catch your employee doing something right and specifically praise them for that action and let them know how valuable it is for you. The One minute reprimand-when employees do something wrong, immediately and specifically reprimand them for that action, though put it in the context of their overall good work. This is all helpful advice in managing people. That way, they are clear on objectives, feel valued and know exactly where they screw up without having to deal with an angry build up.

But really this is the entire substance of the book. Along the way the characters, spout off the same advice and show each other motivational messages on plaques. There is also a lot of advice about touching people to communicate you care. It isn't normally the case, but my guess is that this book would be much better as a movie.


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Wait for it. View all 7 comments. Shelves: self-help. This short book packs a lot of advice about effective management into an allegorical story. The tips are realistic and practical, and not too preachy. Here are my notes, mostly quoted straight from the book: Manager Types Autocratic - "Tough" - Interested in results - Profit-minded - Organization wins while people lose Democratic - "Nice" - Interested in people - People win while organization loses People who feel good about themselves produce good results.

One minute goal setting 1. Agree on your goals.

The One Minute Manager Summary - Four Minute Books

S This short book packs a lot of advice about effective management into an allegorical story. See what good behavior looks like. Write out each of your goals on a single sheet of paper using less than words. Read and re-read each goal, which requires only a minute or so each time you do it. Take a minute every once in a while out of your day to look at your performance, and 6. See whether or not your behavior matches your goals. Help people reach their full potential. Catch them doing something right.

One minute praising 1. Tell people up front that you are going to let them know how they are doing. Praise people immediately. Tell people what they did right — be specific. Tell people how good you feel about what they did right, and how it helps the organization and the other people who work there.

Encourage them to do more of the same. Shake hands or touch people in a way that makes it clear that you support their success in the organization. One minute reprimand 1. Tell people beforehand that you are going to let them know how they are doing and in no uncertain terms. Reprimand people immediately. Tell people what they did wrong — be specific. Tell people how you feel about what they did wrong — and in no uncertain terms.

Stop for a few seconds of uncomfortable silence to let them feel how you feel. Shake hands, or touch them in a way that lets them know you are honestly on their side. Remind them how much you value them. Reaffirm that you think well of them but not of their performance in this situation. The best minute I spend is the one I invest in people. Everyone is a potential winner. Some people are disguised as losers; don't let their appearances fool you.

Hiring choices 1. Hire someone with potential to be a winner; train them to be a winner. Don't use options 1 or 2. Hire someone and pray they work out. Take a minute: Look at your goals Look at your performance See if your behavior matches your goals.

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Instead, remember that performance review is an ongoing process, not just an annual event. Instead, tell people what you expect, then give them plenty of feedback. We are not just our behavior; we are the people managing our behavior.


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To avoid it, always let a person know up front what you are doing and why. Goals begin behaviors; consequences maintain behaviors.

Lesson 2: Right after an employee does a good job, take 60 seconds to praise their work.

View all 9 comments. Is there a word for books that are over one hundred pages long but which summarise themselves in less than one page? In this case everything you need to know is on page, luckily not room, view spoiler [but just in case, I would like to take this opportunity to reiterate: I love Big Brother hide spoiler ]. The rest of the book is some kind of modern fable, presumably because the authors felt embarrassed by the idea of selling their idea on a postcard, that repetitiously repeats that the man Is there a word for books that are over one hundred pages long but which summarise themselves in less than one page?

The rest of the book is some kind of modern fable, presumably because the authors felt embarrassed by the idea of selling their idea on a postcard, that repetitiously repeats that the manager must agree goals with their staff, each goal to take about a minute to explain and discuss expressed on paper in no more than words.

When the employee achieves, partially or completely, the manager immediately praises the employee for about a minute, this to include touching the employee and a period of silence so the employee can really feel the manager's pleasure. If the employee fails to achieve or does badly, then the manager immediately administers a one minute reprimand, this to include touching the employee and a period of silence so the employee can really feel the manager's displeasure view spoiler ["bad employee!

Go to your bed! As far as I know the writers so far haven't designed a range of employee treats to help reinforce these behaviours. I'm sure that marrowbone and charcoal would help strengthen employee's bones and give them attractive, glossy coats, with healthy wet noses an additional bonus. Plainly we are in the same cultural world as the more recent Getting Things Done , but this book has a more precise context. The one minute manager at one point looks out the window and takes the popularity of imported cars in the USA as an Indictment of American Business and implicitly of the USA itself.

We are in era of transition from Carter to Reagan. The USA needs a thorough going, activist philosophy to save itself from foreign domination. Plainly no-one had ever tried that before, had they Fido? In any case the manager is on their own, their organisation will not help them, but you can buy the book and save yourself. The flip side of the worry about change in the business environment - so long dominated by US companies - is immense self-confidence. In this case there is no doubt that goals and behaviours are simple and definable.

They are compared with bowling pins. Set them up and knock them down. In the background I sense the lasting influence of Taylor and his confidence that there is a single right way to do anything, that one can measure, agree on, and teach. This is a world apparently without complexity or openendedness.

Having said that I don't disagree greatly about their advice, though in many cases I wouldn't recommend the touching a because you don't what to catch the lurgy and b because it sounds creepy view spoiler [admittedly reading about sexual abuse scandals in the BBC is inclining me in that direction hide spoiler ] , even though I imagine that what they have in mind is a manly grip of the shoulder, a firm handshake, or a vigorous pat on the head with some light scratching behind the ears. Cringe-worthy writing, overly simplistic, not envisioning any shortcomings to there approach - what could possible have stood in the way of this book becoming a New York Times best-seller?

Not quite the role model I was looking for View all 21 comments. Sep 12, Trey Piepmeier rated it it was ok. The writing is absolutely wretched. It's as if it were written for school children. That being said, I think this is probably a really solid management style. I just wish they showed a little more respect for the reader.

The dialog attribution alone is nausea-inducing. Which is, basically, if you manipulate people into thinking you care about them, they'll do what you want. Of course, it's The writing is absolutely wretched. And this is probably true. It's just a reminder that people care only about themselves, so if you can leverage that, you'll win. It's incredibly short, but this book was painful to read.

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Jul 08, Alex Duncan rated it it was amazing. A must read for new managers. Jun 25, Leah Nadeau rated it it was ok. Well that was a very basic and short book! I liked it but I personally didn't find much value in it. Though, if only my shittiest manager were to have read this book - I would be freed from so much sucky-ass-manager grief!

The structure of this book is so strange It's a story about interviewing several people lol I feel like Blanchard did this to thicken the book, else he cou Well that was a very basic and short book! It's a story about interviewing several people lol I feel like Blanchard did this to thicken the book, else he could have just gotten right to the point.

Blanchard really generalizes people, like when he says "- The number one motivator is feedback on results. Also the book is old for it's time, continually mentioning to make physical contact by placing your hand on your employee's shoulder etc. Nowadays you can report that as sexual harassment. Notes while reading this book: - You're more productive when you feel good about yourself, so get your employee's to feel good. Catch employee doing something right and do a 1min praising and be consistent with it.

Jul 24, Mike Steven rated it did not like it. This was on the shelf on the house I stayed at on my holidays and as I'm supposed to lead a team these days I thought it would be useful. David Brent could have written this book. It's so cheesey and american it's unreal. Basically it has three ideas.

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One minute target setting - all goals mapped out in less than words with each team member getting fourteen or fifteen or twenty odd or something targets. There's also one minute praise. It advises you to 'touch people in a reassuring way' during This was on the shelf on the house I stayed at on my holidays and as I'm supposed to lead a team these days I thought it would be useful. It advises you to 'touch people in a reassuring way' during these sessions. That idea scares me and I don't intend to touch my staff in any manner at any time.

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Finally, if someone has the ability to achieve a goal but fails to do so, there's the one minute bollocking. The first half of this - or 30 seconds I would assume - is a standard bollocking but you must remember to tell the person 'how you feel' about the failure. Then you spend the next half telling the person how you are only bollocking them because you usually have such faith in them and know how good they are. Again, touching is encouraged during this process. It's weird and rubbish. Don't follow a formula as professional people deserve an individual approach. Don't pre-plan to touch people - we're British and touching isn't appropriate in a professional environment.

Stroking someone's arm to show them that 'you care about their success' is inappropriate. Finally, the main thing I hated was how the book was written. It's written as a narrative about an imagined 'young man' who visits a company to talk to a manager. The manager he meets is a 'One Minute Manager' and then, as the book progresses, he meets a number of the manager's staff who tell him about the three pillars of the method. The writing is unconvincing and poor and, as a work of literature it is almost offensively bad. It's a book that succeeds on no levels whatsoever and I pity anyone who thinks that it is a useful tool in which to learn about how to deal with people.

Prospective managers should move away from a formula and look to try to learn about their staff as individuals and as people. The book does hint at this and this is the only lesson that anyone should possibly derive from it. View 1 comment. Jan 17, Stefy rated it it was amazing. Simple, quick and entertaining story about how to manage yourself and be a manager. You'd think there'd be a secret sauce to it, some way to conduct yourself or boss people around in an effective way. Turns out, the three steps of managing goal setting, praising and reprimanding are not only a '"minute" each, but couldn't be more jaw-dropping obvious and right.

Be precise about what you want to get done and the quality it has to be done by, but give autonomy in how it's done. This gives space Simple, quick and entertaining story about how to manage yourself and be a manager. This gives space for creativity and self-motivation.

Find first the positive. A person's confidence in their craft takes some time to build. Don't accumulate wrongs and explode when you reach the last drop, but tell it like it is and always refer to the person's behavior and not integrity. Great book written as a timeless tale. Mar 09, Shanna Kunkel rated it it was ok Shelves: books-for Had to read for work.

Treat people like people and not just worker bees. Common sense. Managers do NOT use this book that's for sure. Aug 21, Yousif Al Zeera rated it liked it. Nice read and very light. The idea is that the Y will set the pins and X will strike the pins using the ball. The catch here in the game is that there is a curtain in between the player who is bowling and the pins he need to strike this is basically a communication GAP or vision GAP between two levels in an organization.

The book has offered 3 management tips which will help you fix the above explained problem. First TIP: MBO management by objective where you set the broad level goal and detailed targets and way to achieve these targets are defined by employee himself. So, now X know how many pins will be there to hit.

Because he was involved in their setup. Second TIP: Now when X throws the ball and hits few pins, in normal scenario Y shouts you missed 3 pins however management should say that you hit 4 pins so instead of telling what he did wrong tell him what he did correct. He already knows what target was, so anyway he can find out what he missed. Third TIP: Course correction where you periodically review and guide the team on what corrective actions are suggested. View all 3 comments. Mar 24, Christopher rated it it was ok Shelves: philosophy-social.

Laughably oversimplified advice, for the most part very truthful and common sensical, that I'm sure works spectacularly in a healthy, homogeneous, and fully functional society that I'm having a hard time envisioning in today's world. Written in , the type of managerial relationship portrayed here was already gone, it just hadn't evidenced itself yet. The advice contained within actually works better for dealing with children, specifically your own, when it comes to the much-stressed aspect o Laughably oversimplified advice, for the most part very truthful and common sensical, that I'm sure works spectacularly in a healthy, homogeneous, and fully functional society that I'm having a hard time envisioning in today's world.

The advice contained within actually works better for dealing with children, specifically your own, when it comes to the much-stressed aspect of "touch" and "physical contact," otherwise the manager may be in for one of a dozen potential future lawsuits that I see arising from implementing some of the advice.

If you want to save this summary for later, download the free PDF and read it whenever you want. Download PDF. All struggles a company could ever possibly face will go back to one simple thing: communication. Imagine someone had sat down with you, right at the beginning, and together you had made a list. The goal is to have targets, which are so specific, that you can review them in 60 seconds or less. Note: The book says three to six goals, but I always vote in favor of less. Less is more. Managers are by definition super busy. Right after someone did a great job, tell them that they did well in that specific instance.

Similar to the one minute praise, you should use it right after the mistake was made and be very specific. To show there are no hard feelings, include a note of appreciation in your criticism. What makes the book more powerful than the mere facts, though, is that it tells a story, in which a manager slowly finds out about the power of one minute management.